Enchanting Chinese Ceramics

Osaka, Japan, is usually off the radar of most tourists. It is Japan’s second largest city and contains many of the advantages of Tokyo on a slightly smaller scale. The food scene is one of the most exciting in Japan, with local specialties such as okonomiyaki (a version of a Japanese pizza cooked on a griddle with your choice of ingredients), unusual fish from the ocean nearby, and small restaurants that present Kushikatsu cooking of seemingly endless ingredients grilled on skewers.

The arts scene is also important, with three local symphony orchestras, lots of chamber music, and local theatre and opera such as Bunruku which combines traditional music with life-sized puppets in 500 year-old stories.

CREATIVITY’S PUZZLE — TADAO ANDO

Building upon what exists, creating that which does not exist — Culture is something that needs to be nurtured on top of accumulated history and memories.  . . . it is about creating a condition where the old and new coexist in a fine balance. 

This quote by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Tadao Ando is an accurate observation about the creative process. I recently had the opportunity to attend an important exhibition of his past and present work at the National Arts Center in Tokyo, Japan. I was unfamiliar with his architectural achievements and happy to learn more about this influential and accomplished person.

What’s Next? Creativity in the Age of Entertainment

My new book, What’s Next? Creativity in the Age of Entertainment, is an exploration of our creative environment today viewed through the lens of my multi-faceted career. I focus on creativity as the background of the arts, innovation and culture, and the inspiration it provides throughout our society. The challenges I’ve observed in our cultural and work environments —confused definitions, the disappearance of arts education and media coverage, misguided and struggling arts organizations, poor education for work and life skills —are all a result of living in the Age of Entertainment.